A Simple Approach to Copyright Education

Copyright compliance

FIRST, you need to educate about copyright law!

How many times have you tried to explain the complex subject of copyright to an audience of blank faces or glazed-over eyes? Explaining copyright can be a daunting task, and even more so as the conversation gets into the deeper and variable nature of copyright. This can result in an audience walking away shaking their heads in confusion or even worse, not willing to comply with copyright legislation or your compliance policies or guidelines.

Copyright Educators Unite

You are not alone in trying to explain this complex subject to your audience. It is necessary to remember that not everyone is as keen to learn about copyright as you are to teach them! Keeping the Copyright FIRST acronym in mind may change the response you get from your audience.

Copyright  =  Fun

Many times people learn more when that learning experience incorporates some fun or enjoyment. Including some fun activities can start the engagement process for the audience.

Interesting

Make the learning interesting. The use of scenarios and exploring possible solutions can be a game changer.

Relevant

Make the experience relevant to the audience. Often the audience has an immediate issue they need to resolve – they aren’t concerned about anything else at that moment. Ask questions to find out what your audience wants to know and why.

Simple

Don’t add more than is necessary to the specific issue being discussed/reviewed. Keep it simple. Break the learning experience into smaller, bite-sized segments. Give time to absorb and build on these smaller bites.

Timely

Make the learning experience timely for your audience. For example, in an educational institution, you could have an information session showcasing some new resources likely to be useful to teachers in their classrooms.

Put Your Best Copyright Education FIRST

Following FIRST will hopefully result in more satisfied customers for you, and an audience that is eager to learn about copyright.

 

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